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20130615
20130623
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the prospects for passage of immigration reform, by a big margin, appeared to brighten considerably today. supporters talked hopefully that they'd met demands for greatly expanded policing of the border with mexico. >> madame speaker, i rise to speak. >> suarez: two republicans went to the senate floor this afternoon to announce a potentially critical compromise on a key sticking point for many in the g.o.p. >> americans want immigration reform, of that there is no doubt. they want us to get it right and that means first and foremost securing the border. >> some people
. rohani called for moderation and for reviving iran's economy. in recent years, international sanctions aimed at rean's nuclear program helped fuel rising inflation and high unemployment. rohani presided over nuclear talks with the west between 2003 and 2005. but today the president elect was not support ceasing iranian enrichment. >> we will make nuclear talks more active. this is a problem. solution to the nuclear problem is just talks. neither threats nor sanctions will work. >> ifill: he left open the door to improving relations with the united states. >> the problem complicated and difficult. there's an old wound that should be dealt with with prudence. of course we are not seeking tension or increase can the tension. common sense says our two countries should think about the future more than the past. >> u.s. officials cautiously welcomed rohani's victory but state department spokeswoman said the obama administration wants to see more. >> we look forward to him and are hopeful that he will fulfill the campaign promises he made to the iranian people such as expanding personal
reserve painted a brighter picture of the economy today. the central bank estimated unemployment will fall a little faster than expected this year and next. chairman ben bernanke said that means the fed may start scaling back its stimulus efforts later this year. he promised it will come in measured steps, to reassure investors. >> we are in a more complex type of situation, but we are determined to be as clear as we can, and we hope that you are and your listeners and the markets will all be able to follow what we're saying. >> sreenivasan: bernanke's words did little to reassure wall street today. stocks fell sharply on fears that if the fed curtails its bond-buying program, interest rates will rise and growth will slow. the dow jones industrial average lost 206 points to close at 15,112. the nasdaq fell nearly 39 points to close at 3,443. the internal revenue service is taking new fire-- this time over plans to pay bonuses to employees. republican senator chuck grassley of iowa said it comes to $70 million, despite a white house directive to cancel such payments due to automatic spendin
economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> by bp. >> and by at&t. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: it could be a breakthrough moment in the longest conflict in american history. u.s. and afghan peace negotiators are going to sit down with the militants who've been battling american troops since 2001. after 12 years of war, senior u.s. officials now say direct talks with the taliban are scheduled to begin within the next few days. the news came as president obama wound up a meeting with french with the at the g8 summit in northern ireland. the president said that the taliban must come prepared to make concessions. >> including the taliban is going to need to accept an afghan constitution that pronounces against violence is committed to
the detention facility at guantanamo bay, cuba. the latest data on the u.s. economy left something to be desired today. factory output barely rose in may, and consumer sentiment fell in june. wall street reacted with a friday sell-off. the dow jones industrial average lost nearly 106 points to close at 15,70. the nasdaq fell nearly 22 points to close at 3,423. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq lost more than 1%. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: today the city of detroit, and its creditors, were presented with a series of painful options. retired city workers were warned of significant cuts in pensions and health insurance and creditors were told the city won't be able to pay them back. the day started with an announcement that the government already defaulted on some debt. it got worse from there. ray suarez has the story. >> make the banks pay. >> suarez: a handful of protesters picketed outside the westin hotel this morning, while inside, detroit's emergency manager kevyn orr laid out a last-ditch plan to 150 creditors to accept pennies on the
. the economy is in far more stable and a much better place than it was before. but what's happened now over the last two or three years is that we've seen a sharp slowdown in growth and an uptick in inflation. and i think those two things combined have fed through into frustration, a broader frustration that people have learned and have appreciated and have come to understand the benefits of having an economic stability. they see where the country should be going and they have had a taste for a bit of equality, a bit more of an improvement in quality of life and now they're concerned that they're going away. that that is slipping out of their hands. >> warner: and why has the hosting of the world cup, what, a year from now, and the olympics become such a sort of rallying cry of this protest? >> well, i think we have to remember that these protests have by coincidence come at the same time as a warmup tournament for next year's world cup. it's called the confederations cup. these enormous stadiums that were built to host these events are being used for the very first time. so all of a sudden
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)